Wioletta Kazimierska-Jerzyk

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Dr filozofii (specjalność: estetyka), mgr historii sztuki, zajmuje się estetyką nowoczesną i współczesną (w szczególności współczesnymi kategoriami estetycznymi), problematyką antropologizacji estetyki, zagadnieniami performatywności w estetyce i sztuce oraz związkami sztuki i kultury popularnej. Współtwórczyni okcydentalistyki - interdyscyplinarnego kierunku studiów, którego program zorientowany jest na praktykowanie humanistyki. Propagatorka aktywizujących metod dydaktycznych oraz aktywnej współpracy środowiska akademickiego z otoczeniem społecznym.

http://wiolettakazimierska-jerzyk.manifo.com/

Wydział Filozoficzno-Historyczny

Instytut Filozofii

adiunkt posiadający stopień naukowy doktora

pracownicy tej jednostki oraz jednostek podległych
Lindleya 3/5
90-131 Łódź
pokój: 317
Konsultacje

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tel.: +48 42 635-61-28, 42 635-61-29, 42 635-61-35

funkcja zastępcy dyrektora Instytutu Filozofii na Wydziale Filozoficzno-Historycznym Uniwersytetu Łódzkiego.



Full List of Publications

Autorzy: Wioletta Kazimierska-Jerzyk

Dzieła mistrzów tr adycyjnegomalarstwa sztalugowego jakoinspir acje współczesnych mur ali – projekt „Off Galeria” (2015), w:Acta Artis studia ofiarowane Profesor Wandzie Nowakowskiej, red. Aneta Pawłowska, Eleonora Jedlińska, Krzysztof Stefański, Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Łódzkiego, Łódź 2016.

Autorzy: Wioletta Kazimierska-Jerzyk
Rok publikacji: 2016

SUMMARY

Masterpieces of Traditional Easel Painting as an Inspiration for Modern Murals – “Off Gallery Project” (2015)
The text discusses the complex characteristics of the activities of the Urban Forms Foundation
during realisation of “The Off Gallery Project”. It was organised to create murals
that were interpretations of the pictures included in the Gallery of Polish Masters (Museum
of the City of Łódź). It also served to increase participation in culture and competence of the
perception of art among residents of the areas threatened by social exclusion. In addition
to the workshops and the creation of murals, the Off Gallery was enriched by participatory
elements, which was a very new and non-typical form of the activity of the Foundation.


Aesthetic Energy of the City. Experiencing Urban Art And Space, Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Łódzkiego, Łodź 2016.

Autorzy: eds. A. Gralińska-Toborek, W. Kazimierska-Jerzyk,
Rok publikacji: 2016

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION, Agnieszka Gralińska-Toborek, Wioletta Kazimierska-Jerzyk

I. AESTHETIC ENERGY OF ART, IDEAS, PLACES AND HUMAN RELATIONS

NEW URBAN DECORUM? CITY AESTHETICS TO AND FRO, Antoni Remesar

URBAN SPACE: THE PHENOMENA OF UNFINISHED IN THE CITIES OF MONTENEGRO, Slavica Stamatovic Vuckovic

AESTHETIC ENERGY OF AN ORDINARY PLACE, Wioletta Kazimierska-Jerzyk

STREET ART AND SPACE, Agnieszka Gralińska-Toborek

“DARLING LOOK! IT’S A BANKSY!” VIEWERS’ MATERIAL ENGAGEMENT WITH STREET ART AND GRAFFITI, Susan Hansen, Danny Flynn

CREATING AN ART TOURIST SPACE IN THE URBAN SPHERE OF LODZ – A THEORETICAL APPROACH BASED ON THE EXAMPLE OF THE URBAN FORMS GALLERY OF MURALS, Justyna Mokras-Grabowska

II. ENERGETIC BODILY EXPERIENCE

BODY CONSCIOUSNESS IN MODERN URBAN SURROUNDINGS: FREERUNNING AND PARKOUR, Jakub Petri

TWO FACES OF ART – PUBLIC AND PRIVATE – IN JOHN DEWEY’S AESTHETIC EXPERIENCE, Ewa Chudoba

III. AESTHETIC ENERGY OF MISSION AND PRACTICE

MURAL PAINTING AND THE SPIRIT OF THE PLACE VERSUS GRAFFITI AND STREET ART, Halim Bensaïd

SET FREE THE ARTISTIC ENERGY OF LODZ! THE EVOLUTION OF THE URBAN FORMS FOUNDATION, Jowita Mróz

ILLUSTRATION ANNEX

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

SUMMARIES

CONTRIBUTORS

INDEX

INTRODUCTION

Energy is the capacity of a physical system to perform work – this is the simplest definition of energy.Energy as a physical quantity is manifested in many forms– asheat, kinetic, mechanical, and chemical energy, or potential energy. In this book, metaphorically referring to the concept of energy, we wish to point out that it is also possible to talk about aesthetic energy and that this concept is very useful in the discussion on the subject of the city. This energy in the context of the city can be understood in two ways. On the one hand, a given place with its own aesthetic nature has its own potential of energy. After all, the city physically, with its space, landscapes, architecture and art, is an object of permanent aesthetic experience. Can this potential be transformed into work? These aesthetic experiences make people abandon certain places and admire others; some cities fall, while others grow. The aesthetic object – and it should be noted that among aesthetic qualities we experience not only beauty or harmony, but also the sublime, tragedy, ugliness and kitsch – in itself, affecting its recipients, may become a source of specific exploitative but also creative activities. The other meaning in which aesthetic energy is understood is related to revealing the aesthetic aspect of human activities. Are we not willing to perform some work in order to save the aesthetic experience or participate in it? It is not difficult to note that the movement of this energy in favourable conditions takes place in a circle: the energy of places affects people's behaviour and people create places full of energy. Lodzis an interesting example of flows of aesthetic energy, it can be said that the city is inherently related to energy. Lodz was established in the 19th century and within just a few decades it transformed from a village of only 939 inhabitants (1827) to the thriving city of textile industry (314,000 inhabitants in 1900), acquiring aesthetic landscape of the city unique in the country, compared to Manchesteror Lyon: brick factories, chimneys, workers' settlements, eclectic tenement houses and villa-style residences of industrialists. The sudden collapse of the industry caused a general decline of the city in the 1990s. In the present time, a huge effort has been made to revitalise the city. Appreciating the value of the places that have lost their functionality, the possibility of the city's development is seen in connection with culture and science. Its dormant energy is sought in the ethos of "industrial Lodz", but not in energy of machines driven first by water, then steam and finally electricity, but in its architecture, space, and most of all in the people who – moved by the history of the city and its post-industrial face – are willing to work for its sake. The symbol of this transformation is the currently revitalised EC1 power plant whose Art Nouveau buildings were put into operation in 1907 (photo 1). In the past, the place used to provide electricity to the entire city and it worked until 2001. Today, as part of a complex covering 90 ha, it becomes the New Centre of Lodz.Whether the concept of seeking energy in that which is aesthetic is appropriate will be soon shown based on this particular example. Therefore, the reader should be forewarned that we will often refer to this particular city in the book.

We ask representatives of various specialisations about the possibility of obtaining and maintaining aesthetic energy, therefore different research perspectives and seemingly distant objects of research – from architecture and urban space through street art and parkour to aesthetic theories – appear in individual chapters. The reflections of our authors always revolve around the aesthetic object or the aesthetically experiencing entity. Thus, we begin with great ideas of urban and aesthetic theories, which found their practical solutions in European cities (A. Remesar), and at the same time we show, based on specific examples, what kind of energy can be hidden in unfinished or even bankrupt ideas (S. Stamatovic Vuckovic, W. Kazimierska-Jerzyk). Aware of the aesthetic potential of art, we point to its effects in urban space (A. Gralińska-Toborek, S. Hansen/D. Flynn). We write about all users of the city, great visionaries and anonymous inhabitants, though additional attention is paid to the tourist (J. Mokras-Grabowska) and traceur (J. Petri). We see them as curiously contradictory entities experiencing the city aesthetically: the first one is subjected to a public offer of the city, while the other one privatises the city through experience, exceeding the established barriers of this experience. We also show how complex a challenge it is to attempt to separate that which is public from that which is privatein our experience (E. Chudoba). We finish the book with statements made by practitioners – culture organisers from non-governmental organisations who use art to transfer energy to people and recover aesthetic energy of places (H. Bensaïd, J. Mróz). These kind of manifestos also illustrate the circulation of aesthetic energy: private organisations protect public/social values, draw attention to the condition of public places and recover these places for the individual, personal aesthetic experience.

We still owe the reader an explanation. Instead of talking in more detail about the content of the book, each chapter is preceded by a graphic commentary and an illustration of its content. We have been inspired to do so by Antoni Remesar, who by means of a graph sums up his reflections on urban decorum. Therefore, we have decided to visualise, with the use of overlapping circles, the network of relationships that make up the issues addressed in the texts, as well as the perspectives from which they are observed. Yellow marks strictly urban issues – places and spaces (we indicate the names of the cities mentioned in the text); red – art contexts; blue – issues related to aesthetic experience; green – complex issues (sociological, political, economic) that are not dominated by a particular discourse. The concepts included in the circles are not keywords provided by the authors, but rather the terms which, according to the editors, describe the content and relate its meaning to the context of aesthetic issues. They are often contradictory terms, as energy is also released through the action of conflicting forces. We hope that as a result of our own, mutually corresponding, though sometimes polemical positions, we will give birth to work that will be directed towards the aesthetic development of cities and the improvement of the quality of our experience.


Experience of Art in Urban Space. Urban Forms gallery 2011-2013

Autorzy: Wioletta Kazimierska-jerzyk, Agnieszka Gralińska-Toborek
Rok publikacji: 2014


‘The strategy of revaluation’ in contemporary reflection on fine arts. Beauty, eclecticism, epigonism, infantilism, Universitas, Kraków 2008 (Polish language, see below English summary)

Autorzy: Wioletta Kazimierska-Jerzyk
Rok publikacji: 2008

‘The strategy of revaluation’ in contemporary reflection on fine arts (SUMMARY)

There is nothing else but epigonism.

Z. Warpechowski

Art, like happiness, arouses the suspiction of infantylism.

T. W. Adorno

Introduction

The term of ‘strategy’ as well as term of ‘revaluation’ do not come from a dictionary of fine arts. The first derives from a military language, the second form an economic one. But in contemporary reflection on fine arts both terms are used very often. What do they mean in the context of aesthetics or art theory?

The strategy of revaluation is a certain camouflaged method of working used by both artist and teoretician of various artistic disciplines. It consists in giving prominence to the meaning of word, which is forgotten or so archaic, that it almost seems to be impossible to use in our days. The method is camouflaged because seems to be an explication at first side, but really creates a completely new definition. The explication is a kind of definitions in the humanities, which is based on respecting the meaning of word are currently used, whereas the strategy of revaluation don’t take into account popular meanings of words.

I. The revaluation of beauty

II. The revaluation of eclecticism

III. The revaluation of the epigone art

What is the role of an epigone in contemporary artistic practice? The very term ‘epigone’ (Gr. Epigonoi, Epigonoi – ‘born afterwords’) suggests an uninspired follower of his more talented predecessors, the one who carries on a trend in the arts (or learning), which has been outdated. I do not agree whit this common view on the epigone art. The most expressive contemporary epigone is the epigone of the avant-garde, but I’m sure the avant-garde is not on the decline, it is still conceivable. Moreover now is the time, i think, to undertake a revisions of some notions, to point out semantic shifts and to salvage the epigone reputation. Let us more carefully the very term under discussion. It appears that the above-mentioned sense of ‘epigone’, the one that has been commonly accepted and applied, is connected only with the word’s figurative use. The ancient Epigones – those ‘born afterwords’ – were sons of leaders who had been killed in actions against Thebes, and they conqered and pillaged Thebes ten years after their fathers defeat. It is clear that the popular use of ‘epigone’ has considerably deviated from its mythological origins. Today the attitude of the epigone has connotations not implying a victory, but rather passive acceptance of the received tradition. But there are many artists, who are still continuing avant-guarde practice, and paradoxically they do not receive much support from conservative audience. They have been present on the cultural scene for many years, and their works have been widely shown and held in great esteem. How is it possible, for the postmodern culture to include the artist, whose creative attitude has preserved most of the characteristics features of modernism? We can take Jean-François Lyotard words as an answer. As he says in perhaps the most often quoted concerning Postmodernism, ‘In order for a work of art to be modern, it must be postmodern’. We may conclude, that just as Postmodernism is part ofmodernism, so postmodernists art does not exclude the avant-garde. So in our days an avantgardist assesses the situation, and like the ancient Epigones seizes our ‘postmodern modernism’.

IV. The revaluation of the infantilisation of art

The problem ofthe infantilisation is present in both modernist and postmodernist art. It has been often associated with the informal, popular understanding of the term ‘infantilism’, connoting childishness, naivety or even immaturity in the work of adult artists and referring to those realisations which make use of the repertory of forms created by children. Such an interpretation of the term ‘infantilism’ usually led to its negative criticism, additionally supported by the psychological or medical definition of infantilism as pathology.

Despite this the problem ofthe infantilisation of art has had o long tradition in the teoretical reflection on art and the positive aspects too. Among the many meanings of the term ‘infantilism’, the biggest inspiration has come from the infantilism being the form of searching for the ‘source of art’. It is based on Jean Jacques Rousseau’s idea of the ‘return to nature’. His conception includes two motifs of key importance to the issue of the infantilisation: the tale of the ‘good savage’ and the postulate of the valorisation of childchod. Rousseau suggests that the progress destroys natural and proper environment of mankind. Arguments of the famousFrench philosopher are aimed against the enlightened mind, its dictatorship and its schematism.

***

The infantilisation of art, like epigonism, is a phenomenon which calls for the difficult decision of opening up the history of art and aesthetics. The postmodern culture seems to be conducive to the revaluation of different terms and attitudes traditionally regarded as negative.



Walter Pater, Konkluzya (na 5 grudnia)

Walter Pater, Konkluzya, w: tegoż, Wybór pism, Księgarnia Polska B. Połanieckiego, Lwów 1909.

Tekst jest dostępny w innym tłumaczeniu również [Walter Pater, Renesans. Rozważania o sztuce i poezji, tłum. Piotr Kopszak, Warszawa 1998] oraz w oryginale [ http://www.authorama.com/renaissance-1.html ]














Eklektyzm. Karta ewaluacyjna przedmiotu

Szczegółowe kryteria oceny i przykałdowa ocena.


Estetyka I, materiały do zaliczenia i egzaminu (r. ak. 2013/14)

Zagadnienia do lektury obowiązkowej (kolokwium/konwersatorium)

Lektura uzupełniająca (wykład/egzamin). Lektura ta jest sumą wskazówek bibliograficznych, nie obowiązuje znajomość konkretnych pozycji, a zawartość merytoryczna, można więc korzystać z innych publikacji, tekstów źródłowych i opracowań. Zestaw ten zawiera jednak – jak sądzę – ekonomicznie wyważone proporcje między tekstami źródłowymi i opracowaniami oraz jest optymalnie dostosowany do treści wykładów, jak również poniższych zagadnień egzaminacyjnych.

Lektura „naduzupełniająca” (nieobowiązkowe, panoramiczne opracowania)

Egzamin – pytania (student/ka losuje dwa pytania, po jednym z każdej grupy oraz analizuje prosty komunikat estetyczny)


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